Lee Enfield 1916 No. 111* SMLE .303

Posted on 31st March 2017 in Uncategorized

A couple of months ago I purchased a 1916 Lee Enfield No. 111* SMLE… I purchased this rifle site unseen… When I picked it up I was surprised to see that stock had been altered, cut down, and was missing several pieces… None the less I paid the agreed amount and took the rifle home… I explained to my wife this was not exactly what I thought I was getting and set it aside for a few days and licked my wounds…

After getting over the surprise of what I had purchased I went to Google to see what I really had… I did a search and was pleased to find these “sporterized” rifles are a legit thing… Many were converted by the factory, in my case Birmingham Small Arms,  because they were no longer fit for military use… This conversion made it more acceptable for civilian use… I was also pleased to note the price I paid was about $200 less that many of the sale prices, which I was quick to point out to my wife…

After a little research I was able to find a few parts, the rear site protector and rear hand guard, which I purchased from Numrich Gun Parts, to make the rifle a  little more “eye” friendly… The rifle came with a 10 box magazine… The bolt, action and barrel all have matching serial numbers… It has a brass butt plate and I added a “period correct” sling…

Included in my purchase was a period correct bore cleaning devise (something like our modern day cloth bore snakes), a 5 round clip, a couple of bandoleers and a muzzle cover… The bore was clean and the bolt very smooth… All in all this has been a fun  and learning experience…

We have yet to have our “day at the range” with my new acquisition but that will be coming soon… What I have found is the ammo is a bit pricey… Expect to pay, for 20 round boxes,  in the $20 to $25 range for good quality ammo in either 150 or 174 grain bullets…

 

Circa 1820 .36 Cal. Cap and Ball

Posted on 9th June 2015 in Uncategorized

SPITZER SHOP ATTRIBUTED, NEW MARKET, SHENANDOAH VALLEY OF VIRGINIA KENTUCKY-STYLE LONG RIFLE, tiger maple full-stock with brass patchbox, inlays including thumb plate and cheek-piece and double set triggers. Later percussion conversion. Has ramrod. Probably Henry Spitzer (1767-1840), New Market, Shenandoah Co., VA. First quarter 19th century. 45.5″ barrel, 60.5″ OAL. Very good condition. Fully functional… Provenance: Property of John Gray of Lebanon, Russell County, VA. By descent from John Gray to his son John Tevis Gray Sr to his son John Tevis Gray Jr.to his son Wilbur (Sandy) Gray to me. The rifle was in need of repair when I received it… The restoration was done by Paul Horowitz, an archival restorationists, thru Little Johns Gunshop in Santa Ana… All work was done using the same tools and materials which were available when the rifle was manufactured back in the very early 1800’s.

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Bullseye Sport celebrates “Grand Opening”

Posted on 14th November 2011 in Uncategorized

My wife and I recently attended the Grand Opening of Bullseye Sport, held on November 11th and 12th, at their new location in the City of Riverside at 6710 Brockton Avenue. The event was well attended and enhanced with several drawings and refreshments.

 

Owners, Philip Pressler (left) and Vincente Torres, have been in business for over 25 years. Seven years ago the business was moved from Downey to the City of Riverside, where they occupied a building less than half the size of the building they are now in, which is just across the street from their old location.

 

When we arrived we were greeted by Alex who, remembering my wife had purchased a. Henry 22. from them a couple of weeks ago, pointed out a sale they were running on Winchester .22 ammunication. He also remembered her sister had just purchased a Sig 40 and that ammo was also on sale.

 

Vincente (second from left, his wife Lilia, son Alex (far right) and daughter Shelsy (far left) all actively participate in operating the customer friendly store.

While talking to Lilia we learned Vincente began working in the business at 18. He started his career at B&R Sales and then went on to Turners and then Sports Kingdom before realizing his dream of opening and operating his own business.

When asking Lilia what Bullseye’s specialty was she responded, “personalized customer service; we want to keep our prices down and affordable and provide a customer friendly shopping environment and to promote the 2nd amendment”. In keeping with their policies the store does offer a 90 day lay-away plan and we found their pricing to be very competitive..

Lilia also stated that both she and her husband immigrated “legally” into the United States from Cuba in 1969. Although a mere 11 years old Lilia remembers that in Cuba, under Castro’s communist rule, the people lost their right to own and possess firearms; their guns were confiscated along with their freedom of speach and any other freedoms they previously had known.

Bullseye Sport operates a very “customer friendly” store. When you walk in the door you immediately feel welcome. Their business hours are Monday thru Friday 10 AM to 6:30 PM. They are open Saturdays from 9 AM to 5 PM unless they are participating in local gun shows. If you are planning on visiting them on a Saturday it is best to call ahead at 951-823-0211. Your can also E-mail them at bullseyesport@yahoo.com for the location of upcoming gun shows they will be attending. Be sure and check out their website at www.bullseyesport.com for specials and announcements.

 

   

 

Bullseye Sport carries a large variety of handguns, sporting and tactical rifles and shotguns from all of the leading manufactures. They can custom order any firearm you may be interested in and will gladly accept FFL transfers from out of state stores.

 

   

 

While we were at the grand opening we noticed the store is well stocked with accessories, sporting and tactical scopes, ammunication, reloading supplies, sporting and tactical gun cases and shooting bags with new lines and inventory arriving daily..

   

 

Future plans include adding an indoor range. As Lilia explained; “our goal is to provide the shooter with everything they need under one roof”.

 

 

Remember – “An ARMED society is a FREE society” … Your comments are requested and appreciated… E-mail them to bigreb@bigreb.com

 

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A Ruger 10-22 – .22 Cal Tack Driver

Posted on 30th August 2011 in Uncategorized

 

 

The Ruger model 10-22 is one of the most widely purchased, and recognized, .22 cal. rifles in America… It got its start back in 1964 and has never lost its popularity… In its stock condition, shown above, it is a very accurate rifle and very affordable at about $225… The rifle also comes in a number of stock configurations and in pink as well as with stainless steel barrel models… It utalizes a 10 round magazine that is superior in its design to create a “jam free” shooting experience…

 It is also one of the most customized sporting arms around… Recognizing the potential in this rifle shooters began to tweak every little part to make a real “tack driver” out of it…

Adding scopes and changing stocks was just the beginning… It didn’t take long for “after market” companies to get involved and start producing custom stocks in both civilian and tactical styles, target barrels, bolts and firing pins, buffers, trigger housing groups, bipods, receiver rails for mounting scopes and quick magazine releases…

There are even attachments to use with the 10 round Ruger magazines whereby you can mount 3 or 4 magazines together for a more enjoyable shooting experience… The 10-22 mags and the quad holder runs around $12 each. You can catch them on sale and they are a great investment… [Editors note] If you plan on purchasing a high capicity mag note the less expensive ones, with the plastic lips, will not work very well. They will stove pipe your rounds. Spend a little more and get the better quality mags with the metal lips for smooth feeding.

 

 

About 6 months ago my Cousin Paul and I were talking about building a “tack driver”… He knew I owned a Ruger 10-22 and suggested we do something with it… I told Paul I already owned a Remington “513T” target rifle (which we will explore in another blog) and was not sure if that was the direction I wanted to go… After a lot of proding, from him and my wife, I finally broke down and said OK…

Paul presented me with a list of parts that included a stainless E.R. Shaw barrel in  .22 long rifle .920″ diameter 1 in 16″ twist 18″ long, upper and lower receiver parts, a stabilization module (muzzle brake) from Volquartsen, a Tapco 10-22 black Intrafuse tactical trainer stock with pistol grip and grip forearm barrel cover, Weaver 1″ tactical rings for a Picatinny mount, a Simmons Whitetail Classic Rifle Scope 6.5-20x 50mm adjustable objective and a Leapers Tactical OP1 bipod… A word of caution… We were going to add a Power Custom Competition Extended Bolt handle. Paul was concerned about this part and I contacted the factory and was assured it would fit without a hitch, NOT! The bolt was too short and even if it had fit properly it would have needed a lot of finishing work to run smoothly so we left the shock charging handle in tact and returned the part without an issue… [Editors note] The extended bolt handle may have worked in a new model. Mine was manufactured in the 70′. Lots more metal and less plastic… All of the parts were purchased from Midway USA and Cheaper Than Dirt at very affordable prices…

The entire project, from start to finish, took about 2 weeks… The cost of the parts were about $350… Remember I already had the rifle… Once completed it was off to the range to see what our new tack driver (pictured below) could do…

The custom built Ruger 10-22 preformed as expected. Paul held a 10 round group at 100 yards that you could cover with a quarter…

 

 

Here is the finished product… A PGO, Ruger 10-22 Tack Driver, ala Cousin Paul… How sweet it is!

 

 

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